Medical Waste Removal 101: Funeral Homes

While not a healthcare facility, funeral homes are organizations that require proper medical waste removal just for the very nature of what they do. Funeral home staff members work with deceased human beings who can harbor a myriad of diseases, both communicable and non-communicable. Before a funeral home can dispose of any waste, guidelines are required to be met.

Medical waste in the funeral industry can include sharps, non-sharps, blood, body parts, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, medical devices and radioactive materials. It is essential for every funeral home to correctly manage their waste both for health reasons and for regulatory reasons.

Examples of materials used in a funeral home or mortuary that are considered medical waste include:

• Arterial tubes, cannulas
• Scalpels
• Scissors
• Incision needles
• Trocars
• Swabs, dressings, and other fabrics that come into contact with a body

Working with the insides of a human body can expose staff to biohazardous material. It is imperative that funeral homes discard disposable objects that contact the body in a clearly marked biohazard container and take suitable precautions to protect everyone that comes into contact with the materials.

Different requirements govern the handling and disposal of hazardous and medical waste and other wastes produced in home operations. It is up to business owners to know who their disposal firms are and how they are dealing with medical waste. Directors should also maintain copies of all waste disposal receipts. Each funeral director bears personal responsibility for the proper disposal of the wastes generated, as required by federal, state, and local law.

MedXWaste services funeral homes in the state of New York and Florida, taking the utmost care and respect for the nature of the funeral business. MedXWaste promises to provide excellent customer service with flexible pickup schedules, compliance training for your staff.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Scroll to Top